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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 134 (some duplicates have been removed)
sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. one word describes the mood of american businesses these days-- "uncertainty." susie, many companies are flush with cash, but they're not spending it or using it to hire workers because they're uncertain about the outlook on a host of important issues. >> susie: whether it's taxes, tom, new regulations, or health care reform, executives are not sure how these policies will impact their businesses. many economists say that uncertainty is a significant obstacle to economic recovery. >> tom: lawmakers return next week to washington, and republicans are expected to reopen debate on parts of healthcare reform. as stephanie dhue reports that'll add even more uncertainty to the business environment. >> as the november election draws near, senate republicans are sharpening their differences with democrats on health care. senator mike johanns says new requirements for small business tax filing have to go. he's making a case for that on youtube. >> this will mean a mountain of new paperwork for as many as 40 million businesses and ot
and countless outlets for high-energy excitement. from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and... - you're listening to the sounds of lukewarm 91.5, the station that's so hot and so cool, it's lukewarm, baby! and i am the tune meister coming at you live with our finalists in our rap competition. are y'all ready for the winner? - whoo! - and the winner is... hector! that means, hector, you will star in a music video directed by the tune meister himself--that'd be me. ha ha! and annie, you are our runner-up, which means, if for any reason hector cannot perform, it's all you. heh! local restrictions may apply. ah-ha! - runner-up? annie scrambler is no runner-up. annie scrambler is a winner! uncle sigmund, you have to do something. oh. couldn't you hypnotize hector? you know, make it so that he can't do the video? - yes. i suppose i could try something. [high voice] uh, excuse me, sir. - hmm? - do you have the time? - uh, sure, ma'am, but you have a watch. - let's not quibble over details, hmm? - uh, it's 12:00. no. 10 of...[yawns] wow. i'm getting really sleepy. - yes. very s
and doesn't help the u.s. economic recovery. but geithner said he was not prepared to label china a "currency manipulator" under u.s. law. >> tom: that reluctance was all too familiar to members of congress, and they grilled geithner with hostile questions. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: even the senators grilling the treasury secretary today admit hearings on china's overvalued currency have become something of a ritual over the years. it begins with the expression of outrage from senators like new york's charles schumer. >> at a time when the u.s. economy is trying to pick itself up off the ground, china's currency manipulation is like a boot to the throat of our recovery. and this administration refuses to try to take that boot off our neck. >> reporter: then, it's the treasury secretary's turn to share concern, to offer tougher rhetoric, and then to explain that declaring china a currency manipulator under the current law will do little more than require more consultations, as treasury secretary geithner explained today. >> wishing something does not make it so, and issuin
. >> they know they are short of their mandate on both counts. >> reporter: vincent reinhart used to help the fed meet its dual mandate as a senior policy adviser. with unemployment at close to 10%, he says it's clear the economy isn't operating anywhere close to maximum employment, which is closer to 5%. and what about price stability? indicators of core inflation are under 1%, with many prices flat or falling. but that isn't the same as price stability. >> it's possible to have too much of a good thing. >> reporter: why? because periods of high unemployment tend to push prices down and prices are not stable when they are rising or falling too much. >> as inflation starts falling and maybe even veering into deflation, the real value of what you have to pay back goes up and up and up. so it's harder for people who borrow, including the u.s. government, in that regard. >> reporter: with the fed failing to meet either of its mandates, economist josh bivens says the conclusion is clear. >> you're missing both mandates, but in the same direction for once. we're not acting aggressively enough to drive
their markets. >> susie: that's u.s. trade rep ron kirk. he joins us for an exclusive interview about our trade issues with china. you're watching "nightly business report" for thursday, september 23. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. president obama today met with china's premier in new york city, and, susie the leaders of the world's two biggest economies pledged to work together on boosting the global recovery. >> susie: but tom, in their public remarks, the men didn't talk about china's undervalued currency. instead, that's said to have topped the agenda for their private meeting. the issue-- keeping china's currency artificially low puts american exports at a disadvantage overseas. >> tom: lawmakers in washington, meantime, are closer than ever to acting on threats to penalize china over its currency. earlier today, i caught up with u.
, and thanks for joining us. too little too late. susie, that's the initial reaction from some business leaders to president obama's latest proposal to give tax breaks for businesses. >> susie: tom, the president will detail the plan tomorrow in cleveland. he's proposing that companies write off 100% of their investments in plants and equipment through next year. >> tom: the administration estimates the plan would cut business taxes by about $200 billion over the next two years. for some businesses, this "expensing" proposal could amount to a half-off sale on new equipment. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: you've probably heard about all those businesses sitting on their money, waiting for things to get better. the president's expensing plan could give executives an incentive to make a big purchase, says small business advocate todd mccracken. >> and what that does is it uses up a lot of extra cash that especially a lot of big companies seem to have right now bur that they're not using, they're not investing. and that has the potential to create jobs. >> reporter: but business groups are luke
by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone, tom hudson is on assignment. jeff yastine joins us. the federal reserve kept its key interest rate at zero, but said it's ready to take action to boost the economy when the time is right. that announcement came today as the fed wrapped up its policy meeting in washington. susie, one thing that stood out at this meeting is the fed is getting more worried about inflation. the problem is, inflation is too low, and below what the fed considers acceptable. >> susie: that could be the catalyst for the fed to pump more money into the economy. so what will the central bank do next? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: two more meetings. one two-day event in early november, the other in mid december. that's the window the fed has left this year to boost the economy. but, whether the central bank eases monetary policy in the next few months depends on what happens with the economy. and, fed watcher dana saporta says it's clear now that policymakers have linked their next move to inflation, or more specifically, the lack of it. >> i think the fed is loath to
double its u.s. workforce this holiday season, adding 45,000 temporary workers. the toy seller has already announced plans for 600 temporary toys 'r us express shops. the associated press is reporting the f.b.i. and the labor department are investigating the former head of the service employees international union for possible corruption. at issue: andy stern's approval of a california union leader's salary. stern resigned from the union abruptly in april. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's word on the street is "frontier." find out why that could be the place for global investors with an appetite for risk. >> susie: $1,300 and then some-- that's where gold prices closed today. gold rallied for the fifth straight day to a new high of $1,308. the precious metal is up 32% in the past year as investors seek safety. long-time metals traders like m.f. global's kevin grady think the buying binge will continue. >> well, i think we definitely hit $1,400 by christmas and possibly $1,500. i think, you know, what you need to look at is, who is going to step up and sell it? the bottom line is that
the treasury yields are telling us, that i think that september might be true to form. >> reporter: as to why september historically is so grim for stocks, experts have a few theories. some say investors refocus on their portfolios after summer vacation. others speculate many americans sell stocks in the fall to pay hefty tuition bills. suzanne pratt, "nightly business report," new york. >> susie: here are the stories in tonight's nbr newswheel. a mixed close on the last trading day of the month. the dow added five points, the nasdaq lost six, and the s&p 500 edged up a fraction. volume climbed a bit from yesterday's pace-- 1.4 billion shares on the big board and 2.1 billion on the nasdaq. minutes from the fed's latest policy meeting show some members think the central bank should provide more support if the economy weakens further. fed officials eventually agreed to reinvest the proceeds from their huge mortgage bond portfolio into treasuries. single family homes in major cities saw a modest price increase in june. the s&p/case shiller home price index rose 1% from may. but economists warn t
did you do the deal? >> first of all, airtran brings us a number of things. they have a safe low cost high quality operation. they have a strong low fare brand. but most importantly, it provides us an opportunity to expand our route network. they fly places that we don't. we have very little overlapping routes. but notably, their largest operation is in atlanta. and we have no service to atlanta at all, as one example. it brings us more access to new york's laguardia airport, as well as first-time access for us to reagan national airport in washington d.c.. >> susie: where kelly, why did you do it now? >> i feel like we're ready now. first of all, things are so much better today than they were a year ago. our profit outlook is solid. we have plenty of cash on hand. we have a very strong balance sheet, with credit rating agencies affirming our credit rating today. so financially we're very well prepared for this. we also have a very strong leadership team. who is ready to add this major task to our list. and then we have the tools in place today that we just haven't had in the past to
street today, and in the offices of many u.s. banks. not only are the new capital standards looser than expected, but there's nearly a ten-year phase-in-- considered an eternity in the marketplace. experts say the so-called basel 3 requirements eliminate some uncertainty for financial stock investors, who were worried the rules would be tougher. k.b.w.'s fred cannon says, more importantly, they should help banks do business more cautiously. >> it means that there is risk retention for the banks. if they make a loan or do a mortgage securitization or subprime loan, they are going to have to take some risk and hold it on their balance sheet. and, that's a good thing because that's clearly one of the issues that got us into trouble a couple of years ago. >> reporter: some experts also believe the new capital standards will result in the return of juicy dividends, something that's been missing since the financial crisis unfolded. >> the banks have been precluded from paying dividends because they didn't know what capital needed to be, and they had to keep it all. now we see a number of bank
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 134 (some duplicates have been removed)